Suboxone Treatment

Partridge Comprehensive Health Services Inc.

Evelyn Partridge, DO

Board Certified Family Medicine located in Philadelphia, PA

Opioid dependence is a significant and widespread problem. And if it affects you, the Partridge Comprehensive Health Services can help you or your loved one return to a happier, healthier life with Suboxone®: a medication that can alleviate opioid withdrawal and prevent relapse. If you or someone in your family has an opioid dependency, contact Dr. Evelyn Partridge’s team in Philadelphia to make an appointment right away.

Suboxone Treatment Q & A

 What is medication-assisted treatment?

Partial opioids like Suboxone are an essential part of medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence. Additional means are also needed to help you overcome opioid dependence. Some of these other methods include:

  • Education  
  • Counseling  
  • Support
  • Behavioral modification

When you use Suboxone as part of medication-assisted treatment, it helps restore your normal state of mind so you can focus on education and counseling.  

What is a partial opioid agonist?

A partial opioid agonist is an opioid that's much weaker than a full opioid like oxycodone. Since Suboxone is a partial opioid agonist, it may not feel like you've taken anything, it may feel mildly pleasurable, or you may experience partial pain relief.

A significant benefit of Suboxone is the "ceiling effect." That means that taking more Suboxone won't give you any increase in opioid effect: You can’t get high on Suboxone even if you take more. This effect makes Suboxone safer because it reduces the suppression of breathing that results from a ‘full opioid’ overdose.  

What is Suboxone?

Suboxone is an FDA-approved medication for treating opioid dependence and preventing relapse. It comes as a thin film, and you have the option of placing it in either of two places: under your tongue or inside your cheek.

Its contents are buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid that binds to opioid receptors on your cells. It produces effects similar to other opioids, but they're limited and milder than those produced by full opioids.

Naloxone is an opioid antagonist, which means that it binds to opioid receptors on cells and blocks the effects of opioid drugs.

Together, the components of Suboxone stop other opioids from getting into your cells, as they limit opioid euphoria. Overall, Suboxone reduces the symptoms of opioid withdrawal so that it's easier for you to stop opioid use altogether.

If you live in Philadelphia and need help to overcome opioid dependence, contact Partridge Comprehensive Health Services for an appointment with Dr. Evelyn Partridge to see if Suboxone is right for you.